Friday, April 1, 2016

Military Definitions - A

A to Z Blogging Challenge.  My topic is MILITARY DEFINITIONS.
A – Alfa [or Alpha]
Morse code - dot dash

Active duty — full-time duty in active military service of the United States, including members of the Reserve Components serving on active duty or full-time training duty. Does not include full-time National Guard duty.  My son is active duty in the US Navy.

Admiral – the highest ranking officer of the US Navy and the US Coast Guard. 

Air Force - the aerial warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces. Initially part of the United States Army, it became a separate branch in September 1947. The U.S. Air Force provides air support for surface forces and aids in the recovery of troops in the field. The stated mission of the USAF today is to "fly, fight, and win in air, space, and cyberspace." Yes, I noticed cyberspace also. That was a big surprise to me. My son, with true Navy solidarity, calls this branch of service the "Chair Force."  The guest speaker at his high school graduation was retired Air Force.  After the ceremony, my son asked him about his job.  He replied "I flew a desk."

Alpha Charlie – slang for a$$ chewing, a verbal reprimand. 

Amphibious vehicle – a vehicle that can be used as transport on both land and water. 

Army - the largest and senior branch of the United States Armed Forces. Performs land-based military operations. Authorized in the United States Constitution. After the Revolutionary War, the Congress of the Confederation created the United States Army in June 1784, to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The mission of the U.S. Army is "to fight and win our Nation's wars, by providing prompt, sustained, land dominance, across the full range of military operations and the spectrum of conflict, in support of combatant commanders." 

ASVAB - the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is a multiple choice test, administered by the United States Military Entrance Processing Command [MEPS]. The test is used to determine qualification for enlistment in the United States Armed Forces. The highest score is 99. Scores are normalized and are not straight percentages. For example, a score of 75 does not mean the test-taker answered 75% of the questions correctly. It means the test-taker scored better than 75% of all examinees. My #1 son took this test at age 18. He scored 99. 

As you were - return to what you were doing. 
 

22 comments:

  1. I am visiting for the a-z challenge. Your son sounds very smart.

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    1. Smarter than me, that's for sure.

      Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. My boy did well on the ASVAB too. The recruiter asked him, "Are you done?" When he must have finished it in record time.
    I'll be following you on your April journey ~
    www.thriftshopcommando.blogspot.com (No. 115 on the list)

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    1. Wow he does sound smart! I don't think my son finished quite that fast.

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  3. Totally new to this information , i am loving it..

    @Ashwini Mrinal Bhagat from
    Mind and Matters

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it. Thanks and good luck with the challenge.

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  4. Very interesting! I always wondered what Alpha Charlie meant and now I know!

    I'm visiting from the A to Z Challenge
    Shelly @ http://hangryfork.com

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    1. Yep, okay to give but not to receive lol

      Good luck with the challenge.

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  5. A great theme choice when the country is at war regardless of the administration's denial of this fact. Your theme supports the services that we owe so much. Hope you have time in your busy life to come and enjoy 26 hotels and inns.

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    1. I'll definitely stop by and check out your blog. Thanks.

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  6. The Air Force is responsible for flying, fighting, and winning in cyberspace? How? Do they have tech we don't know about? Is Tron based on real Air Force combat methodology?! :)

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    1. Yep, I thought that part was really interesting. Who knew? And I remember Tron. I guess that shows my age.............

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  7. Dena, this is actually helpful. Great for research and for understanding the military. I like it. Very cool.

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    1. If you ever figure out the military, please share. Most of it's still gibberish. I have to ask my son to speak English a lot.

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  8. Dena, I love it. My middle son spoke to the navy and they felt due to his ASVAB indicated he would do well on a nuclear sub. My reaction was, "God help us all."

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    1. The Navy offered my son a signing bonus to be a nuke, but he turned it down. He wanted to be outside working, not cooped up. Which begs the question of why he chose Navy and not Army, but so far he likes it.

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  9. Dena, my Dad was in the Air Force during the Korean War. He talks about his training in Washington State and visits in the UK when he was on leave. He doesn't talk about the war. Thank you for sharing this information.

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    1. My son talks about SOME aspects of what he does, but not everything. And I don't ask. I don't think I want to know........

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  10. Alright, Alpha Charlie, I love it. A new way to describe getting your ass chewed out. That's one I'm gonna keep in the back pocket to pull out in a story. Thanks for that!

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    1. Sounds like I'm gonna wanna read that story!

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  11. I love the list of short definitions. The flag symbol for morse code is very cool and Alpha Charlie, LOL.

    Congrats to your son for scoring so high.

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    1. Short is definitely good for this challenge! Glad you came by.

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