Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Military Definitions - D

A to Z Blogging Challenge.  My topic is MILITARY DEFINITIONS.


D Delta 
morse code dash dot dot

Day zero the first day of basic training [boot camp].

Dear John term referring to a significant other breaking up with a service member through a letter.

Delayed Entry Program also called DEP.   A program under which an individual may enlist in a Reserve Component of military service, with a future reporting date for entry into active duty.  My son enlisted in the Navy in June, and was part of DEP until January when he reported for boot camp.  During DEP he studied things like the names of the persons in his chain of command, types of ships and planes, what the insignia for ranks looks like, how to march and salute, etc.  The waiting period was because the rating [job] he signed up for, had boot camp slots available in January.

Demilitarized Zone DMZ.  A specific area [for example between North and South Korea] in which any type of military force is banned.

Deployment - to organize and send out people and/or things for a particular purpose.  Typically, a battalion or other group of service members is sent out for a specific mission.  My son has had two overseas deployments, one to Okinawa and one to Spain and the Middle East.  Oddly, my son has also had two stateside deployments, to Virginia and Colorado.  I never knew a deployment could be within the US until the first of these occurred.

Detachment also called DET.  A part of a unit separated from its main organization for duty elsewhere. A temporary military or naval unit formed from other units or parts of units. My son is assigned to the air DET detachment of his battalion.

Dog tags - an informal term for the identification tags worn by military personnel.  The tags are primarily used for the identification of dead and wounded soldiers.  They contain personal information such as name, SSN, basic medical information, and religious preference.

Draft The conscription of qualified citizens in military service.  In the United States, men between the ages of 18 and 25 are required to register so that an involuntary selective service can be implemented if needed.  My oldest son voluntarily enlisted in the Navy.  My second and third sons [ages 20 and 18] are registered with selective service, which they did online, altho my second son is disabled and will never be required to serve.  This year, because of the opening of most military jobs to women, registration may [but not currently] be required of women, so when my daughter turns 18, she may also be required to register.

 

18 comments:

  1. Thanks for another informative post.

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  2. I learn something new here every day. Great theme for a-z.

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    1. Thanks! Hope your AtoZ is going well also.

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  3. I actually knew all these. First time. I like the letter D and the military.

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    1. Kinda like a test. We're happy when we know the answers to all the questions. =)

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  4. Entertaining post, but the thought of my daughters having to sign up for selective service makes me nervous. (And no, that rhyme wasn't planned.)

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    1. I'm not too happy with the thought of my daughter signing up either. But loved your rhyme!

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  5. Yep, I've had my share of Dear John letters. My parents clearly were not thinking about my love life when they named me.

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  6. Love your theme. Saw the "Dear John" and it reminded me of the 21st Century practice of breaking up with someone through a txt msg.

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    1. Yeah that's a curse for the 21st century.

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  7. I didn't know about 'DET' - thanks for that! Also, I'm loving how thought-provoking these are (my husband wants me to write a WWII novel at some point) but then I need to grit my teeth and tell myself to ONLY focus on the current WIP! Thanks though; these are very informative :)

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    1. I usually have two WIPs going at the same time. That way when I burn out on one I can move to the other.

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  8. Dog tags always had their own inimitable sound ...

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  9. "Dog tags" sounds fun, but when you think about your description, it's actually quite sobering: "The tags are primarily used for the identification of dead and wounded soldiers." Another thought-provoking post, Dena.

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    1. I've seen my son's dog tags. Fortunately it was when they were around his alive neck. Wouldn't want to see them the other way..........

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